People Groups 2016-11-08T16:32:27+00:00

Most Significant Unreached People Group Communities in Metro NY

This is an ever-changing list. If you have updated information, please contact us. For a pdf of the info below, click here.

Below is a prioritized list of church planting needs in Metro New York among unreached and least-reached people groups—those groups that have little or no indigenous community of Christians to spread the gospel to their people and others. The list looks specifically at peoples’ locations within Metro New York that are strategic for reaching their communities. The assumption is that, at least in the 1st generation of Christians, peoples-specific churches should be started that will most effectively spread the gospel to the rest of their people and near-culture people groups. It is also assumed that the gospel will spread most rapidly among a people if the churches started primarily consist of converts and not just Christian-background people with a similar culture or language. As a result, we have not counted churches as started among a people group, even if a church has started that primarily consists of people from the same country and speak the same language, if the church primarily has Christian-background members that are removed from the dominant religious and social structure of a given people group (e.g., there are around a dozen Pakistani churches in Metro New York but only a handful of Muslim-background Christians in these churches because they are so far removed from the dominant Pakistani Muslim culture).

Priority in the list is given to those communities of people groups that have little or no engagement with the gospel, that have no churches, and that have no one focused on starting a church among them. A people group community is listed as having some engagement with the gospel if there are regular Bible studies taking place with them or the gospel is shared with them on a regular basis. Priority is also given to those people groups that, considering their global population and status of Christian witness, Metro New York serves as one of the more strategic places to reach them. Also weighed in the priority list is the size of the people group’s population in the city as well as their specific concentrations within the city. The list does not include people groups that have a primarily Christian presence already—even if that Christian presence is not necessarily evangelical. Also weighed was the people group’s ability to spread the gospel to other cultures beyond their own. For general Metro New York profiles on different people groups, visit our website unreachednewyork.com.

In order of subjective priority.

  1. Lubavitch Jews, Crown Heights, Brooklyn, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There are around 20,000 Lubavitch Jews in Metro NY (community estimate) and this area on Eastern Parkway is the headquarters of the Chabad-Lubavitch Empire, which costs around $800 million a year to operate. They are missionary Jews, whose mission is to spread Orthodox Judaism throughout the world. Their headquarters in NYC, lack of Christian presence, and missionary nature that could spread the gospel to other Jews make them a top priority for focused church planting.
  2. Satmar Jews, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Satmars are the largest Hasidic Jewish community in Metro New York and their headquarters are here. Up to 60,000 (community estimate) live in Williamsburg. A majority of the Satmar in the world live in Metro New York, and they are not supporters of    Moroccan-Jew-Brooklynthe nation of Israel.
  3. Satmar Jews, Kyrias Joel, Monroe, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Satmars are the largest Hasidic Jewish community in Metro New York and their headquarters are here. Approximately 23,000 live in Kyrias Joel, a village they created for themselves within the town of Monroe in Orange County. Almost all Satmars live within the village and about the only contact these people have with non-Hasids within their village is with Hispanic grocery store workers and construction workers.  A majority of the Satmar in the world live in Metro New York, and they are not supporters of the nation of Israel.
  4. Bukharan Jews, Forest Hills, Queens, NY (no church, some engagement). The largest concentration of Bukharan Jews in the world is in the Forest Hills and Rego Park neighborhoods of Queens and no church has been started among them. There are workers among them and some Christians. Around 50,000 Bukharans live in Metro New York (community estimate) with a majority living in this area of Queens. **A house church has started in Queens**
  5. Syrian Jews, Ocean Parkway, Brooklyn, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Most of the approximately 75,000 Syrian Jews in Metro New York (community estimate) live in the Ocean Parkway area of Brooklyn. This is the largest Syrian-Jewish community in the world. They mainly intermarry with other Syrian Jews and contact with non-Jews is minimal.
  6. Mashadi Persian Jews, Great Neck, Long Island, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Around 4,000 Mashadi Jews live in Great Neck (community estimate). They are very insular and have little interaction with other Jews, much less non-Jews. The Great Neck Mashadi community makes up around 25% of the Mashadi Jews in the world. Israel has around 10,000 total, but the community in Great Neck is more connected with one another and preserves their heritage and culture more.
  7. Bobover Jews, Borough Park, Brooklyn, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Numbering around 10,000 in Metro New York (community estimate), the Bobov Jews are the third-largest Hasidic dynasty based in New York City. Borough Park in general is home to the largest number of Orthodox Jews in Metro New York.
  8. Vizhnitz Jews, Kaser, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Around 6,100 Jews (Jewish Population in the US Study, 2011) live in the village of Kaser, with almost all of them being of the Vizhnitz Hasidic Dynasty. Vizhnitz is the 2nd largest Hasidic dynasty in Israel, where its headquarters are located. There are at least three villages/towns in Metro New York that are almost 100% Jewish. Kaser is one of them, alongside Kyrias Joel and New Square. Others are being developed.
  9. Skver Jews, New Square, NY (in the town of Ramapo, Rockland County). (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts).  There are around 20,000 adherents worldwide in the Skver Hasidic dynasty–whose headquarters are in New Square. Around 5500 Jews (Jewish Population in the US Study, 2011), mainly Skver, live in New Square.
  10. Hasidic Jews, Monsey, NY (no church, some engagement, no church planting efforts). There are a wide variety of Hasidic and ultra-Orthodox Jews living in Monsey. Around 10,000 Jews (Jewish Population in the US Study, 2011) live in Monsey. The town itself is not exclusively Jewish but the majority Hasidic presence dominates Monsey culture.
  11. Tehrani Persian Jews, Great Neck, Long Island, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Numbering around 11,000 in Metro New York (community estimate) and mainly concentrated in Great Neck, the Tehrani Jews are more open than the Mashadis in interacting with other Jews–and possibly non-Jews. Los Angeles/Beverly Hills, CA has the largest Tehrani Jewish population in the US.
  12. Syrian Jews, Deal, NJ (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). When Syrian Jews from Brooklyn started prospering economically, the wealthy built summer homes in Bradley Beach, NJ, and later in nearby Deal. While several thousand of the estimated 75,000 Syrian Jews in Metro NY (community estimate) eventually settled in the Deal area year-round, the Syrian-Jewish population still swells exponentially each summer with seasonal residents from Brooklyn. The Metro New York Syrian Jewish community is the largest in the world. They mainly intermarry with other Syrian Jews and contact with non-Jews is minimal.
  13. Soninke/Serecole Muslims, Highbridge, Bronx, NY (no church, some engagement). Although one effort has begun recently in Mali, there is no solid Soninke church anywhere in the world. Around 5,000 Soninke from Mali, Gambia, Senegal, Mauritania, and France live in New York City (community estimate), with this area in the Bronx having a large concentration. There are around 2 million Soninke in the world and an estimated 100 scattered Christians.
  14. Mandinka Muslims, Highbridge, Bronx, NY (no church, some engagement). There are around 1.3 million Mandinka in the world and around 50 Christians. Up to 5,000 Mandinka live in NYC (community estimate), with this area of the Bronx home to their largest mosque and community center.
  15. Yemeni Arabs, Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, NY (no church, some engagement, no church planting efforts). The percentage of Muslims (99%) that make up the population of Yemen is one of the highest in the world, and the country of Yemen has been particularly resistant to Christian missionaries. Around 20,000 Yemenis live in Metro New York (community estimate), with the Bay Ridge area hosting approximately 4,000 of those. Yemenis own a lot of delis and businesses where it is easy for outsiders to engage with them.indian-gentleman
  16. Punjabi Sikhs, Richmond Hill, Queens, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Sikhism is the world’s fifth largest religion. Around 80,000 Sikhs live in Metro New York (community estimate) and a large concentration of these live in Richmond Hill. Sikhs are often open to talking about spiritual matters.
  17. Wolof Mouride Muslims, Harlem, NY, NY (no church, some engagement). There are around 30,000 Senegalese in Metro New York (community estimate), over half of which are Wolof Mourides. Mouridism is an Islamic Sufi sect that is very organized and influential. For example, the Mouride parade in NYC attracts more people than any other African parade in the city. 116th Street in Harlem is often dubbed “Little Senegal” because of their large presence. Wolof is the trade language of Senegal. Out of the 4.5 million Wolof in the world, there are less than 200 Christians.
  18. Senegalese Tijani Muslims, Harlem, NY, NY (no church, some engagement). A significant minority of the 30,000 Senegalese in Metro New York (community estimate) are Tijani Muslims. They are both Wolof and Futa Toro, and are often at odds with the Mourides—the most influential Islamic sect from Senegal. 116th Street in Harlem is often dubbed “Little Senegal” because of their large presence. Out of the nearly 3 million Futa Toro in the world, there are less than 100 Christians.
  19. Tibetan, Jackson Heights, Queens, NY (no church, some engagement). Over 3,000 Tibetans live in Metro New York (community estimate), with the largest concentration in Jackson Heights. New York is host to the largest population of Tibetans outside China, India, and Nepal, and one-third of Tibetans in the US live in Metro New York. The activism on behalf of Tibet and influence of Tibetans based out of NYC also makes engagement with Tibetans in NYC increasingly significant.
  20. Israeli Jews (Sabras), Kew Gardens Hills, Queens, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Up to 200,000 Israelis live in Metro New York (community estimate). However, only those who were born in Israel are called Sabras, who typically have a stronger national identity than other Jews who arrived in Israel later in life. Sabras are spread throughout Metro New York, and Kew Gardens Hills is just one of many places with a small concentration.
  21. Afghan Muslims, Flushing, Queens, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There are around 16,000 Afghan Muslims in Metro New York (community estimate), with Flushing having the largest concentration. Several Afghan mosques are in Flushing. Only a couple of known Muslim-background Afghan Christians exist in Metro New York.
  22. Pakistani Muslims, Midwood, Brooklyn, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Up to 30,000 of the estimated 120,000 Pakistanis in Metro New York (community estimate) live in “Little Pakistan” around this area of Coney Island Avenue.
  23. Bangladeshi Muslims, Astoria, Queens, NY (no church, some engagement, no church planting efforts). The Astoria/Long Island City area has one of the two largest Bangladeshi concentrations in Metro New York and no concentrated work is known of to start a church among them there. Approximately 100,000 Bangladeshis live in Metro New York (community estimate). Although many Muslims have reportedly come to faith in Bangladesh, we have not seen the same fruit in NYC as there is still no Bangladeshi church in the city primarily made up of Muslim-background Christians. Many of the Bangladeshis in this area are Sylheti—whose language is quite different than Bengali.
  24. Levant Arab Muslims, South Paterson, NJ (no church, some engagement). Levant Arabs include those from Palestine, Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan (Iraqis will be included in this group as well). South Paterson hosts the largest Arab Muslim concentration in Metro New York. Over 50,000 Levant Arab Muslims live in Metro New York (community estimate), with South Paterson having the largest concentration.
  25. Egyptian Arab Muslims, Astoria, Queens, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Up to 60,000 Egyptian Muslims live in Metro New York (community estimate) with Astoria having one of the largest concentrations. A “Little Egypt” has developed around Steinway Street in Astoria. The largest concentration of Egyptians in the US is in Metro New York.
  26. Fulbe Futa Muslims, Morrisania, Bronx, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There are an estimated 7,500 Fulbe Futa Muslims in Metro New York (community estimate) with this area of the Bronx hosting their community association and largest mosque in the city. The Fulbe Futa are from Guinea and are part of the ethnic group that helped spread Islam to other parts of West Africa. Staunchly Muslim, there are over 3 million Fulbe Futa in the world with only around 50 known Christians.
  27. Bangladeshi Muslims, Jackson Heights, Queens, NY (no church, some engagement). The Jackson Heights area has one of the two largest Bangladeshi concentrations in Metro New York and no concentrated work. Approximately 100,000 Bangladeshis live in Metro New York (community estimate). Although many Muslims have reportedly come to faith in Bangladesh, we have not seen the same fruit in NYC as there is still no Bangladeshi church in the city primarily made up of Muslim-background Christians.
  28. Bangladeshi Muslims, Jamaica, Queens, NY (no church, some engagement). Approximately 100,000 Bangladeshis live in Metro New York (community estimate) and this area of Jamaica has the 3rd largest Bangladeshi concentration in the city. Although many Muslims have reportedly come to faith in Bangladesh, we have not seen the same fruit in NYC as there is still no Bangladeshi church in the city primarily made up of Muslim-background Christians.
  29. Bangladeshi Muslims, Kensington, Brooklyn, NY (no church, some engagement). Approximately 100,000 Bangladeshis live in Metro New York (community estimate) and this area of Jamaica has the 4th largest Bangladeshi concentration in the city. Although many Muslims have reportedly come to faith in Bangladesh, we have not seen the same fruit in NYC as there is still no Bangladeshi church in the city primarily made up of Muslim-background Christians.
  30. Bangladeshi Muslims, Parkchester, Bronx, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Approximately 100,000 Bangladeshis live in Metro New York (community estimate) and this area of Jamaica has the 5th largest Bangladeshi concentration in the city. Although many Muslims have reportedly come to faith in Bangladesh, we have not seen the same fruit in NYC as there is still no Bangladeshi church in the city primarily made up of Muslim-background Christians. Many of the Bangladeshis in this area are Sylheti—whose language is quite different than Bengali.
  31. Bangladeshi Muslims, Ozone Park, Queens, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Approximately 100,000 BangladeJoannas-pics-Indians-Queens-Jackson-Heights-around-73rd-st-37th-aveshis live in Metro New York (community estimate) and this area of Jamaica has the 6th largest Bangladeshi concentration in the city. Although many Muslims have reportedly come to faith in Bangladesh, we have not seen the same fruit in NYC as there is still no Bangladeshi church in the city primarily made up of Muslim-background Christians.
  32. Fulani Muslims, Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, NY (no church, some engagement). This enclave of Fulani is a mix of Fulani groups from Mauritania, Senegal, and Guinea. The area around Fulton and Franklin has one of the two largest concentrations of African Muslims in the city. Several thousand Fulani are estimated to be in the area (community estimate).
  33. Maghreb Arab Muslims, Astoria, Queens (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). This group mainly consists of Moroccans, Algerians, and then Tunisians. The largest concentration of Moroccans in the US is in Metro New York—with close to 14,000 people in Metro New York born in Morocco (ACS 2010). Moroccans are the 2nd largest Arab group represented in “Little Egypt” in Astoria.
  34. Maghreb Arab Muslims, South Paterson, NJ (no church, some engagement). This group mainly consists of Moroccans, Algerians, and then Tunisians. The largest concentration of Moroccans in the US is in Metro New York—with close to 14,000 people in Metro New York born in Morocco (ACS 2010). Immigration from Morocco has been on the increase. South Paterson has the largest concentration of Arab Muslims in Metro New York, and the 2nd largest in the US.
  35. Egyptian Muslims, Jersey City, NJ (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Up to 60,000 Egyptian Muslims live in Metro New York (community estimate) and, although Jersey City is home to the largest Egyptian Copt population in the US, it is also one of the most concentrated areas for Egyptian Muslims. Overall, Jersey City has the largest concentration of Egyptians in the US.
  36. Egyptian Arab Muslims, Bay Ridge, Brooklyn (no church, some engagement, no church planting efforts). Up to 60,000 Egyptian Muslims live in Metro New York (community estimate) and one of their greatest concentrations is in the Arab enclave in Bay Ridge. The largest concentration of Egyptians in the US is in Metro New York.
  37. Levant Arab Muslims, Bay Ridge, Brooklyn (no church, some engagement, no church planting efforts). Levant Arabs include those from Palestine, Syria, Lebanon, and Jordan (Iraqis will be included in this group as well). Bay Ridge has the largest Arab Muslim population in New York City. Over 50,000 Levant Arab Muslims live in Metro New York (community estimate), and only Paterson has a larger Levant Arab population than Bay Ridge within the area.
  38. Egyptian Arab Muslims, South Paterson, NJ (no church, some engagement). Up to 60,000 Egyptian Muslims live in Metro New York (community estimate), with South Paterson hosting one of their main concentrations. South Paterson has the largest concentration of Arab Muslims in Metro New York, and the 2nd largest in the US. The largest concentration of Egyptians in the US is in Metro New York.
  39. Gorsky-Kavkazi Jews, Flatbush, Brooklyn, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Around 10,000 live in the Ocean Parkway area of Brooklyn (community estimate), which makes up about 10% of their population in the world. Around 50,000 live in Israel.
  40. Kosovar Albanians, Pelham Parkway, Bronx, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). The largest concentration of Albanians in Metro New York is in this area of the Bronx. A majority of them are Kosovar Muslim Albanians, numbering in the tens of thousands (community estimate). Many of them own or work in Italian restaurants throughout New York City. There are only a few known evangelical Christians among Kosovar population in Metro New York.
  41. Afghan Hindu/Sikhs, Hicksville, Long Island NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There are around 5,000 Afghan Hindu/Sikhs in Metro New York (community estimate) with the largest concentration in Hicksville. This is about the same number of Hindus/Sikhs left in Afghanistan, most having fled Taliban rule after enduring persecution. Most have fled to Pakistan and India.
  42. Bambara/Maninka/Jula Muslims, Harlem, NY (no church, some engagement). There are approximately 15,000 Bambara, Maninka, and Jula Muslims in Metro New York (community estimate), all of which are Mande peoples even though they have distinct dialects and often come from different countries. The Jula mainly come from Ivory Coast and Burkina Faso. The Bambara primarily emigrate from Mali, and the Maninka come from Guinea and Mali. These peoples have very similar cultures and languages and often intermingle in Metro New York.
  43. Hausa Muslims, Highbridge, Bronx, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). The Hausa, numbering around 35 million people, are one of the largest unreached Muslim people groups in the world. There are around 3,000 in Metro New York (community estimate), with the Highbridge area of the Bronx hosting the largest concentration. Hausa in Metro New York are primarily from Niger, Ghana, and Nigeria.
  44. Bosniaks, Ridgewood, Queens NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). An estimated 10,000 Bosniaks live in Metro New York (community estimate) with Ridgewood having one of the two largest concentrations (Astoria being the other).
  45. Pakistani Muslims, Jackson Heights, Queens NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). One of the three largest concentrations of Pakistanis in Metro New York is in Jackson Heights. An estimated 120,000 Pakistanis live in Metro New York (community estimate).
  46. Indian Muslims, Jackson Heights, Queens NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There are 580,000 Indians in Metro New York (ACS 2010), and 10-15% of these are Muslim. There are over 60,000 Indian Muslims in the Metro New York (community estimate) based on these figures, and Jackson Heights serves as their main commercial node.
  47. South Asian Muslims, Flushing, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There is a mélange of South Asian Muslims in Flushing (Pakistanis, Indians, Bangladeshis). Tens of thousands of South Asian Muslims live in Flushing (community estimate), and out of all population groups in Metro New York, South Asians have the largest number of Muslims.
  48. Indian Hindus, Flushing, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There are around 330,000 Indian Hindus in Metro New York (ACS 2010) and Flushing is home to one of their largest concentrations and one of their largest temples.
  49. Turks, Cliffside Park, NJ (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). The second largest concentration of the estimated 70,000 Turks in Metro New York (community estimate) is in Cliffside Park.
  50. Turks, Sunnyside, Queens (no church, some engagement). The largest Turk concentration in New York City is in Sunnyside, Queens, although the largest Turk concentrations in Metro New York are in Paterson and Cliffside Park in New Jersey. An estimated 70,000 Turks live in Metro New York (community estimate).
  51. Turks, West Haven, CT (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). West Haven is home to several thousand Turks—one of the largest concentrations of the estimated 70,000 Turks in Metro New York (community estimate).
  52. Persian Muslims, Jamaica, Queens (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There are up to 60,000 Persian Muslims in Metro New York (community estimate), with their largest mosque being in this area of Jamaica.Burmese-Monks-Dag-Hammarskjold-Plaza-47th-St-and-1st-Ave
  53. Burmese Buddhists, Prospect Heights, Brooklyn, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There are up to 10,000 Burmese Buddhists in Metro New York (community estimate) with this area of Brooklyn hosting their largest temple. Less than 1% of the Burman, or Burmese people, from Myanmar are evangelical Christian.
  54. Central Asian Muslims, Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There has been a recent influx of Central Asian Muslims (mainly from Uzbekistan and Tajikistan) into this area of Brooklyn and into the Forest Hills area of Queens. Numbers are unknown, but at least several thousand are believed to be present (community estimate).
  55. Albanians, Tompkinsville, Staten Island, NY (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There are up to 200,000 Albanians in Metro New York (Albanians community estimate, ACS 2010 counts around 65,000 in Metro NY with Albanian ancestry), with the northeastern part of Staten Island hosting one of the three largest Albanian concentrations in Metro New York. Tompkinsville has been attracting a lot of Kosovar Muslim Albanians, and mainly consists of Gheg-speakers. A slight majority of these are Muslim and a significant minority is Catholic. Around 10% of the Albanians in Metro New York live in Staten Island (ACS 2010).
  56. Albanians, Ridgewood, Queens (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There are up to 200,000 Albanians in Metro New York (Albanians community estimate, ACS 2010 counts around 65,000 in Metro NY with Albanian ancestry), with Ridgewood home to one of the three largest Albanian concentrations in Metro New York. This population is about ½ Muslim and ½ Christian Albanian Orthodox.
  57. Albanians, Waterbury, Connecticut (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). There are up to 200,000 Albanians in Metro New York (Albanians community estimate, ACS 2010 counts around 65,000 in Metro NY with Albanian ancestry). Waterbury has a growing Albanian population (several thousand, community estimate), mostly from Southeast Albania next to the Greece border. This Albanian community is primarily Muslim
  58. Indian Hindus,Jackson Heights, Queens, NY (church status unknown, some engagement, no church planting efforts). There are around 330,000 Indian Hindus in Metro New York (ACS 2010) and Jackson Heights is home to their largest commercial center in New York City.
  59. Sri Lankan, Tompkinsville, Staten Island (no church, no/little engagement, no church planting efforts). Sri Lankans estimate their community numbers around 5,000 people in Staten Island while ACS 2010 counts 999 out of 6,573 Sri Lankans in Metro New York as living in Staten Island. Their presence is very visible in Tompkinsville along Victory Blvd.
  60. Orthodox Jews, Lakewood, NJ (one church, some engagement, no church planting efforts). Over half of the 93,000 residents (ACS 2010) in fast-growing Lakewood Township, NJ are Orthodox Jews. Three-quarters of the town’s children attend private Jewish schools and Lakewood is home to one of the largest yeshivas in the world. At least one messianic synagogue is in the area.
  61. Indo-Caribbean Hindus, Richmond Hill, Queens (engaged and churches started). Up to 300,000 Indo-Caribbeans live in Metro New York (community estimate), a majority of which are Hindu. Their major enclave is in Richmond Hill.
  62. Japanese, Manhattan (some engagement and one church). Mid and lower Manhattan is home to the largest number of Japanese in Metro New York, with 28% of the 51,000 Japanese in Metro New York living in Manhattan (ACS 2010). The Manhattan population consists of businessmen and their families, students, and young creatives.
  63. Nepali, Jackson Heights, Queens (some engagement, one church). The Jackson Heights area is the hub of the estimated 30,000 Nepalis in Metro New York (community estimate). Even those who do not live in the neighborhood come to shop and socialize.
  64. Thai, Elmhurst,  Queens (one or two churches, some engagement). Up to 30,000 Thai live in Metro NY (community estimate, ACS 2010 lists around 12,000). This area of Elmhurst/Jackson Heights is the location of their largest temple and most concentrated population.
  65. Gujarati, Iselin, NJ (some churches, some engagement). The Iselin/Metuchen/Edison area is home to one of the largest Indian concentrations in Metro New York. A great majority of these in Iselin are Gujarati Hindus. Around 110,000 Gujaratis live in Metro NY (community estimate), based off of ACS 2010 info on Indians. The largest concentration of Gujaratis in North America is in the Edison/Iselin/Metuchen area.
  66. Turks, South Paterson, NJ (church exists, some engagement). The largest concentration of the estimated 70,000 Turks in Metro New York is in South Paterson (community estimate, ACS 2010 reports roughly 37,000 people in Metro NY with Turkish ancestry).
  67. Indonesian Muslims, Elmhurst, Queens (no church primarily MBB, several Indonesian churches in area, some engagement). Around 20% of the estimated 15,000 Indonesians in Metro New York are Muslim (community estimate). Although there are many Indonesian churches in Metro New York, including some with pastors who converted from Islam, there is still not an Indonesian church primarily consisting of Indonesian Muslim-background Christians.
  68. Russian-speaking Jews, Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, NY (engaged and churches started). New York is populated by more Russian Jews than anywhere else in the world. These Russian (actually from anywhere in the former Soviet Union) Jews number up to 400,000 in Metro New York (American Jewish Committee 2000), with Brighton Beach being their main enclave.
  69. Korean-Chinese, Flushing, Queens (some churches, some engagement). Up to 20,000 Korean-Chinese live in Metro New York, with Flushing being the center of their community. These are ethnic Koreans (mainly originating from North Korea) who have emigrated from China where they have an autonomous region called the Yanbian Prefecture.

Revised July 17, 2012